Hummingbird – The Story behind the Photo

As we make our way onto a structured format for the “article” types of ideas for the Guyana Photographers’ Group, we are pleased to have Ryan Beharry give us his story behind the “Hummingbird” shot that is in the Wildlife album on the group here.

Ryan has graciously consented to write   it, and we are happy to give you the Story behind the Photo.


I was on a camping trip with my family at the intermediate savannah, Berbice, Guyana.  We were liming and making jokes when I saw a humming bird fly across and went into the bushes.  Armed with my camera and tripod I followed in the direction it flew.  My brother and I were trying to get a perfect shot of him.  As the bird landed on a branch, we took a few photos but it flew away.  After a few minutes it came back, which was quite noticeable because of the noise that its wings were making.  Again we took several shots of him trying to catch him in mid-air, but again it flew away before we could get a perfect shot.  So we decided to go swimming.

About an hour or so later, I returned to the spot it was last seen.  A few minutes after I heard him flying around and I dashed for my camera and tripod.  I noticed it was flying around a long green leaf with something at the end of it.  I stood there motionless taking some photos of him as he flew around this strange white thing which was really its nest.  Disappointingly it flew away again.  I saw a log on the ground not too far from its nest so I sat on it and held the camera to my face on a tripod, trying desperately not to move about.  Not long after, it came back again and I started taking shots again.  Somehow it flew right up where I was sitting and it was as if it was looking at me.  As I sat there it flew around as if it was curiously inspecting me.  I tried desperately not to move because I didn’t want it to fly away again.  After it was finished inspecting me, it flew to its nest and entered as if to take a rest.  As it was flying around its nest before landing, I used the continuous burst mode to get as many shots as possible.  As you can see my patience paid off because I was able to get a few perfect shots.  In the end it was worth my time and patience.

I spent about an hour taking over 100 photos just trying to get that perfect and unusual photo.   The camera setting I used to capture this rare moment were 1/60 sec, f/4.5, ISO 200, focal length 110mm.


Ryan Beharry is an HD Inventory Clerk at Pharsalus Gold Inc., who freelances as a graphic artist and IT Technician.  After buying the Nokia N8 in March of 2011 he began taking photos with it and that’s where it started, in November of the same year he decided to really pursue photography and bought his first dSLR.

He shoots a Nikon D5100 with the 18-55mm Kit Lens and a 70-300mm long telephoto lens.


If you have suggestions for future articles in this series please email the suggestions (including the link to the photo on the Guyana Photographer’s Facebook Group) to Story@GuyanaPhotographers.com

17 thoughts on “Hummingbird – The Story behind the Photo

  1. So patience paid off. 🙂 This is a very hard bird to capture in a picture. Tried once no luck at all. The nest almost looks like a rotting or dried up apple core. Thanks for sharing.

  2. Such a beautiful photo, hummingbirds over all are such amazing creatures,their wings can flap between 15 and 200 times per second and can fly up to 71 miles per hour! With this in mind we can all appreciate the patience, creativity & skill that went into taking this shot especially coming from an amateur photographer. Looking forward to seeing more of Ryan’s photos & of course from other Guyanese Photographers.

  3. My dear Ryan I am so proud of you! I absolutely love this photo, I hope to get the chance to feature it in one of my calendars. You have truly found your calling. Keep up the good work, you know you have had my support from day 1.

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